Activity Collection


Show all pages

Current Search Limits

Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

showing only Pollution & Waste Show all Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

Results 11 - 20 of 25 matches

Garbage Archaeology
Gem Baldwin, Edmonds Community College
Students will look at the garbage we create as a culture in a deeper and more connected way and theorizing about the culture that creates and uses it. Designed for use in an online course, it could certainly be adapted for use in grounded courses as well.

Bioregion Discipline: Anthropology
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Cultures & Religions, Pollution & Waste

Visualizing Social Justice in South Seattle: Data Analysis, Race, and The Duwamish River Basin
Eunice Blavascunas, University of Washington
We examine the factors of race and environmental contamination, starting from the premise (and data proving) that race is not a biological, scientifically valid category, but a social, historical construction with real world consequences for equal access to health, resources, and power.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Sociology, History
Bioregion Scale: Regional, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Water & Watersheds, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Lifestyles & Consumption, Pollution & Waste, Social & Environmental Justice, Human Impact & Footprint

Courting Environmental Justice: Science, Community Knowledge and Public Health
Lin Nelson, The Evergreen State College
While this module was developed when we followed the federal criminal case around WR Grace and asbestos exposure in a small Montana mining town, it can be adapted for a range of learning experiences regarding environmental justice, argumentation, strategizing, remediation and sustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Promising Pedagogies, Human Health & Wellbeing, Pollution & Waste, Promising Pedagogies:Case Studies

Climate Instability and Disease
Clarissa Dirks, The Evergreen State College
The module was designed to introduce students to a variety of biological processes of infectious disease that are connected through human activities and climate instability.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Health & Wellbeing, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption, Ecosystem Health, Cultures & Religions

Is The Water Safe for Aquatic Life?
Sue Habeck, Tacoma Community College
In this field activity students ponder sustainability issues such as point and non-point sources of pollution (including personal contributions), impacts of pollution, and potential mitigations.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry, Biology
Bioregion Scale: Campus, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Impact & Footprint, Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Water & Watersheds

Skeleton Keys: Bonified Biology
J. Brian Hauge, Peninsula College
This series of exercises focuses on: the importance of observation in science; the proper use of scientific terminology and writing; the interrelationships between anatomy and position in a food web or energy pyramid; the biology of exotic species; toxins in the environment; animal use; and, the evolutionary significance of each of these topics.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Pollution & Waste, Food Systems & Agriculture, Ecosystem Health

State of Your Own Backyard
Ardi Kveven, Ocean Research College Academy at Everett Community College
Students evaluate water quality data as indicators of the health of an ecosystem and manage, graph and analyze data from an online database. This activity is designed to facilitate student interest in their ecosystem, focusing on where they live.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology
Bioregion Scale: Home/Backyard, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Water & Watersheds, Pollution & Waste, Sense of Place

Environmental Justice in Tacoma: A Non-Majors Qualitative Assessment of Pollution and Public Policy in the Local Community
Jim Gawel, University of Washington- Tacoma
This activity is designed to get non-environmental majors to qualitatively examine their own community for evidence of environmental injustice. Using a mix of evidence from online sources (U.S. Census, EnviroMapper, Toxic Release Inventory, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, etc.) and field observations, student groups describe the population and pollution sources found within an assigned elementary school district in Tacoma.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Lifestyles & Consumption

Tracking the Carbon Footprint in Drug Design-- Medical, Environmental, Social Implications
James Y. Chen, Sound Community College
In this activity, students conduct a lab exercise over three lab sessions by taking a small sample of a pharmaceutical compound, slightly modifying its chemical structure, purifying the modified product sample and analyzing it for yield, purity and identity.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Human Health & Wellbeing, Pollution & Waste

The Sustainability Triangle: How Do We Apply Science to Decision Making?
Brian Naasz, Pacific Lutheran University
This writing assignment uses the "Sustainable Development Triangle" as a framework to critically evaluate an environmental issue of the student's choice. This learning activity provides an opportunity for an introductory chemistry student to use the sustainability's "Triple Bottom Line" as a tool to use material learned in the classroom to look at how environmental science helps inform economic and social/cultural factors in the development of sustainable solutions to our environmental challenges.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Natural Resources, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Climate Change, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Social & Environmental Justice, Food Systems & Agriculture

Evergreen State College