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Results 1 - 7 of 7 matches

Your Environmental Impact
Eric Baer and Mayra Hernandez, Highline Community College
The following homework assignments are designed to build understanding of personal water use, sewage, waste generation and disposal, pollution sources and impacts, and energy use and costs.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Mathematics
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Energy, Water & Watersheds, Pollution & Waste

Meditation and Collection: "Garbage Reduction"
Gary L. Chamberlain, Seattle University
The course examines a number of unsustainable practices, the "worldview" or framework which emerged from the confluence of Christianity, the Renaissance and rise of modern science, and industrialization. We then examine new forms of Christian theological reflection leading to the construction of a framework reinforcing practices of sustainability and environmental justice.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Global, Home/Backyard
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Ecosystem Health, Social & Environmental Justice, Pollution & Waste, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Human Impact & Footprint

Is The Water Safe for Aquatic Life?
Sue Habeck, Tacoma Community College
In this field activity students ponder sustainability issues such as point and non-point sources of pollution (including personal contributions), impacts of pollution, and potential mitigations.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Campus, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Water & Watersheds, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Ecosystem Health, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Visualizing Social Justice in South Seattle: Data Analysis, Race, and The Duwamish River Basin
Eunice Blavascunas, University of Washington
We examine the factors of race and environmental contamination, starting from the premise (and data proving) that race is not a biological, scientifically valid category, but a social, historical construction with real world consequences for equal access to health, resources, and power.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Sociology, History
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Water & Watersheds, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption, Social & Environmental Justice

State of Your Own Backyard
Ardi Kveven, Ocean Research College Academy at Everett Community College
Students evaluate water quality data as indicators of the health of an ecosystem and manage, graph and analyze data from an online database. This activity is designed to facilitate student interest in their ecosystem, focusing on where they live.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology
Bioregion Scale: Home/Backyard, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Water & Watersheds, Sense of Place

Mapping Stormwater Runoff Infrastructure for the City of Bothell
Robert Turner, University of Washington-Bothell Campus
Term-long course activity for student groups to map the flow of stormwater runoff on newly developed or altered properties in and for the City of Bothell.

Bioregion Discipline: Geoscience, Environmental Studies, Geography
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Design & Planning, Pollution & Waste, Promising Pedagogies:Civic Engagement & Service Learning, Water & Watersheds, Cycles & Systems

Environmental Justice in Tacoma: A Non-Majors Qualitative Assessment of Pollution and Public Policy in the Local Community
Jim Gawel, University of Washington- Tacoma
This activity is designed to get non-environmental majors to qualitatively examine their own community for evidence of environmental injustice. Using a mix of evidence from online sources (U.S. Census, EnviroMapper, Toxic Release Inventory, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, etc.) and field observations, student groups describe the population and pollution sources found within an assigned elementary school district in Tacoma.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Social & Environmental Justice

Evergreen State College