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Bioregion Topical Vocabulary

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Social Change and the Climate Crisis: Toward a Sustainable Future
Mary Lou Finley, Antioch University
Students gain hands-on research experience and increase their understanding of the applicability of theories of social change and further information about climate change.

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Climate Change

Alternative Deicers: An Application of Freezing Point Depression
Jennie Mayer and Daniel Mitchell, Bellevue Community College
Road deicers raise several environmental and cost concerns. In this activity students consider alternatives while investigating colligative properties.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Human Impact & Footprint

Making Our Campus More Sustainable and Democratic
Eric Chase, South Puget Sound Community College
With the goal of addressing sustainability within the bioregion, students will generate their own assessment of the needs of the particular learning institution in which they are a part. In a sense, this is a giant student generated service-learning project around the topic of campus sustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Promising Pedagogies, Civic Engagement & Service Learning, Human Impact & Footprint

Doing Sociology: Media Portrayals of [Over]Consumption
Kayleen U. Oka, Seattle Central Community College
This assignment aims to illuminate connections among consumption/capitalism, media/ideology and the degradation of the environment. It also serves to introduce students to the data collection method of content analysis.

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology
Bioregion Scale: National/Continental, Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Pollution & Waste, Social & Environmental Justice, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint

Acidification of Freshwater Streams and Lakes
Katy Olsen, Pierce College
Students research the acidification of freshwater streams and lakes, identify at least one of the sources, and determine how their daily activities contribute to the problem.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Campus
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Water & Watersheds, Human Impact & Footprint

Bioregion Assignment
Claus Svendsen, Department of Environmental Conservation, Skagit Valley College
A weekly bioregion homework assignment exploring for the student local landscape changes. What were the past natural conditions and native uses to todays uses, as well as projected changes in the coming decades.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Regional, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Water & Watersheds, Ecosystem Health, Sense of Place, Natural Resources, Human Impact & Footprint

Indigenous Food Relationships: Sociological Impacts on the Coast Salish People
Ane Berrett, Nothwest Indian College
In this unit, students will analyze the macro level of societal influences which have interrupted micro level ecological relationship between plant and man. Sociological concepts such as sub culture, dominant culture, stages of historical change (Hunter Gatherer societies to Technological societies), stratification and poverty will be addressed through the sociological perspective. Students will experience solutions of sustainability which are interdependent with local place and people. Learning activities involve using the "citizen's argument," oral presentations, portfolio creation, written reflections and experiential service learning projects.

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology, Biology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Home/Backyard, Local Community/Watershed, Regional
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Food Systems & Agriculture, Cycles & Systems, Human Impact & Footprint, Lifestyles & Consumption, Sense of Place, Cultures & Religions

Climate Instability and Disease
Clarissa Dirks, The Evergreen State College
The module was designed to introduce students to a variety of biological processes of infectious disease that are connected through human activities and climate instability.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Health & Wellbeing, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption, Ecosystem Health, Cultures & Religions

Is The Water Safe for Aquatic Life?
Sue Habeck, Tacoma Community College
In this field activity students ponder sustainability issues such as point and non-point sources of pollution (including personal contributions), impacts of pollution, and potential mitigations.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry, Biology
Bioregion Scale: Campus, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Impact & Footprint, Ecosystem Health, Pollution & Waste, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Water & Watersheds

Ecosystem Services and Environmental Economics
Claus Svendsen, Department of Environmental Conservation, Skagit Valley College
In this exercise, students explore the value of ecosystem services of an ecological restoration project that they are proposing. They will be able to compare the ecosystem services value to the cost of the restoration project.

Bioregion Discipline: Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Water & Watersheds, Human Impact & Footprint, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Natural Resources

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Evergreen State College