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Results 1 - 9 of 9 matches

Our World, Our Selves
Tim Walsh, South Seattle Community College
Students will understand how ethics and psycho-emotional factors influence our relationship to and our use of the natural world. Students will read, mark, and summarize text and will use writing as a tool to explore the connections between ethics, psychology, and sustainability.

Bioregion Discipline: English
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Food Systems & Agriculture, Cultures & Religions, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint, Social & Environmental Justice, Pollution & Waste

Meditation and Collection: "Garbage Reduction"
Gary L. Chamberlain, Seattle University
The course examines a number of unsustainable practices, the "worldview" or framework which emerged from the confluence of Christianity, the Renaissance and rise of modern science, and industrialization. We then examine new forms of Christian theological reflection leading to the construction of a framework reinforcing practices of sustainability and environmental justice.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Local Community/Watershed, Global, Home/Backyard
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Ecosystem Health, Social & Environmental Justice, Pollution & Waste, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Human Impact & Footprint

Sacred Food and Carbon Footprint
Hirsh Diamant, The Evergreen State College
This activity examines how understanding cultural or religious studies and ecology can help us to become grounded, focused, mindful, and engaged world citizens.

Bioregion Discipline: Religious Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Cultures & Religions, Human Impact & Footprint

Swimming Upstream: Relating Trapped Energy in Organic Hydrogenations to Use of Reduced Hydrocarbons as Energy Sources
Shane E. Hendrickson, Wenatchee Valley College
An activity designed to inform the student of the potential and pitfalls of storing energy by the generation of reduced organic molecules, particularly as pertains to the generation of ethanol from molecules of a greater oxidation state and the ultimate fate of oxidized carbon when the energy potential is realized. As a part of a discussion of sustainability issues, the activity will be part of a discussion of global energy generation and use and couched in a form similar to the US energy flow trends.

Bioregion Discipline: Chemistry
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Energy, Human Heath & Wellbeing, Natural Resources, Food Systems & Agriculture, Human Impact & Footprint, Sustainability Concepts & Practices

Climate Instability and Disease
Clarissa Dirks, The Evergreen State College
The module was designed to introduce students to a variety of biological processes of infectious disease that are connected through human activities and climate instability.

Bioregion Discipline: Biology, Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Cultures & Religions, Human Heath & Wellbeing, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption, Human Impact & Footprint

Doing Sociology: Media Portrayals of [Over]Consumption
Kayleen U. Oka, Seattle Central Community College
This assignment aims to illuminate connections among consumption/capitalism, media/ideology and the degradation of the environment. It also serves to introduce students to the data collection method of content analysis.

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology
Bioregion Scale: National/Continental, Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Social & Environmental Justice, Human Impact & Footprint, Pollution & Waste, Lifestyles & Consumption

Exploring Personal Footprints
Bev Farb, Everett Community College
Students apply the main research methods in sociology to explore their personal footprints (i.e., the global consequences of their individual actions).

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology, Environmental Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Human Impact & Footprint, Lifestyles & Consumption

Social Change and the Climate Crisis: Toward a Sustainable Future
Mary Lou Finley, Antioch University
Students gain hands-on research experience and increase their understanding of the applicability of theories of social change and further information about climate change.

Bioregion Discipline: Sociology, Environmental Studies
Bioregion Scale: Global, Local Community/Watershed
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Lifestyles & Consumption, Climate Change, Human Impact & Footprint, Sustainability Concepts & Practices, Social & Environmental Justice

Extending "The Land Ethic" and The Golden Rule to the Whole Biotic Community
Don Foran, The Evergreen State College and Centralia College
A component of an Introduction to Ethics course involving research and reporting on a specific sustainability issue. The class presentation will help the student think about extending Leopold's "Land Ethic" and "The Golden Rule" to the whole biotic community.

Bioregion Discipline: Philosophy, English
Bioregion Scale: Global
Bioregion Topical Vocabulary: Ecosystem Health, Promising Pedagogies:Reflective & Contemplative Practice, Human Impact & Footprint, Ethics & Values, Social & Environmental Justice

Evergreen State College