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What do Squirrels know about Climate Change?
This activity was developed during the Teaching Climate Change from the Geological Record workshop, held in August 2010.Contributed by: Beth Norman, Allan Ashworth, and Russell W. Graham Topic: Squirrels - Nuts ...

Calibrating the Younger Dryas
Contributed by: Thom Davis, Greg Wiles, Roger Brown, David Bary This activity was developed during the Teaching Climate Change from the Geological Record workshop, held in August 2010.Key words: Radiocarbon ...

Mammoths and Mastodons
This activity was developed during the Teaching Climate Change from the Geological Record workshop, held in August 2010.Contributed by Susan Conrad, Alison Smith, and Stephanie Peek Topic: Mammal biogeography and ...

Climate, Ecoregions, and the Mammals Who Live in Them
This activity was developed during the Teaching Climate Change from the Geological Record workshop, held in August 2010.Contributed by Jonathan Hoffman, Beth Johnson, and Mark Merrit Topic: Studying mammal ...

Last Glacial Maximum
Kristine DeLong, Louisiana State University
This is an outline of an activity I am developing using model output from the CLIMAP study for my Quaternary Paleoecology and Paleoclimate class.

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Climate History from Deep Sea Sediments
DATA: Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Core Data. TOOL: Virtual Ocean. SUMMARY: Locate potential core, log, and seismic data to map the marine sediment biostratigraphy. Search for a specific planktonic foraminifera that prefers warmer ocean conditions.

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Lab 7: Future of the Cryosphere
The lab activity described here was developed by Erin Bardar of TERC for the EarthLabs project. Use the button at the right to navigate to the student activity pages for this lab. To open the student pages in a ...

CLEAN Selected This activity has been selected for inclusion in the CLEAN collection.
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Clam Dissection
Roy Plotnick, University of Illinois at Chicago
Dissecting a living clam to see how soft parts and life mode can be reconstructed from the preserved shells. Note: clams are purchased at a local market.

Teaching geologic time and rates of landscape evolution with dice
Kate Ruhl, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Landscape evolution provides a convenient framework for understanding geologic time and rates because students can observe how processes like erosion and deposition shape their surroundings. In this example, students build 3-D sandbox models based on topographic maps and design and stage a "virtual adventure race." Sandbox landscapes are used to illustrate erosional processes,while local examples are used to discuss landscapes as transient or steady over different time- and length scales. Dice experiments illustrate radioactive decay and the shape of the age equation curve, and 14C dating, geochronology and thermochronology are introduced as "stopwatches" that start when a plant dies, a crystal forms, or a rock nears the surface and cools to a certain temperature. The sandbox model and thermochronometer "stopwatches" are combined to measure erosion rates and rates of landscape change. Ultimately, model rates (cm/hour) calculated from stopwatch times on the order of seconds can be related to geologic rates (km/My) calculated from real million-year-old samples.

Modeling U-Series Concordia/Discordia Using STELLA
Kirsten Menking, Vassar College
U-Series dating techniques are widely used to determine the absolute ages of some of Earth's oldest rocks, but the concordia/discordia diagram can be quite difficult for students to grasp. I have produced a STELLA-based lab exercise to develop students' understanding of this important chronologic technique. Students create models of the two isotopic decay systems and run these models to create the concordia diagram. They then carry out experiments in which they "add" or "remove" varying amounts of lead or uranium in simulation of metamorphism. In the course of the lab, students are introduced to the concepts of exponential decay and secular equilibrium as well as modeling concepts such as the creation of if-then statements.