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Hurricane Tracking
This is a homework assignment that focuses student attention on ongoing hurricane/tropical storm development, often during the height of hurricane season. The students are directed to a web site (I like ...

Hurricane Investigation
This is a simple homework assignment that will reinforce topics discussed in lecture as well as enabling students to search and analyze information on the web.

Unit 3: Hurricane Tracks and Energy
The purpose of this unit is to learn some of the scientific tools used to determine hurricane location, path, and strength. Students plot the path of a recent hurricane (Irene, 2011), work with an online viewer to ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
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Where's the volcanic threat?
Students investigate Costa Rican volcanic hazards using (a) the amount of silica in volcanic rocks, (b) a highly-simplified geologic map and (c) a satellite image of Costa Rican night time illumination (i.e., human ...

Investigating slope failure and landscape evolution with red beans and rice!
Students investigate the behavior of a slope profile over geological timescales using a very simple experimental apparatus. The lab allows students to understand concepts of equilibrium, controls on slope profile, ...

Evaluating Rainfall, Landslides, and Weather: Big Sur, California
This activity leads to understanding common landslide hazards in the area and how they relate to weather patterns and/or local geology.

The Science of Disasters eTextbook Activity
The Science of Disasters etextbook is a Softchalk activity designed to give students an introduction to disaster terminology including risk and resiliency. It is typically used as a pre-reading assignment for non-science majors in an introductory disasters class.

Comparison of Two Hurricanes
In this activity students synthesize ideas from lecture, reading, and viewing two PBS NOVA videos on hurricanes.

Family Stress theories and risk communication to evaluate and build family resilience
In this activity, students use theoretical knowledge about family stress theories to analyze family vignettes and make predictions about the level of risk or resilience each family might have should a natural disaster occur. To increase resilience, risk communication strategies are discussed.

Evaluating natural hazards data to assess the risk to your California home
Students use a series of maps and natural hazard data to evaluate the risk to a building structure of their choice in the state of California. For each hazard, students rate the potential risk in two dimensions: (1) Probability - probability that a hazardous event "may" occur, and (2) Severity of Impact - the size of the impact in terms of cost and impact on human health.

A Kinesthetic Demonstration for Locating Earthquake Epicenters
A kinesthetic activity for students to understand the technique for locating the epicenter of an earthquake. It is performed indoors and outdoors in three lessons.

Living with Volcanoes: An Introduction to Geoarchaeology
This activity introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of geoarchaeology through a case study of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE. It combines short lectures with questions requiring analyses of a ...

Developing student literacy on risk, resilience, and strategies for living with disaster uncertainty
In this guided research and critical thinking activity, students prepare a research paper comprised of two parts: 1) a "state-of-the-science" review and synthesis of selected literature from risk and resilience research (provided) and 2) a brief critical appraisal of how current knowledge is (or could be) applied to building disaster resilience in a real-world scenario. Part 2 will be set in a student-selected hazard context (coastal hazards, flooding, or earthquake), employment sector (academia, government, private industry, services, non-profit), and geopolitical sphere of influence (e.g., Resilience to earthquake disaster in the student population at Universidad de Lima, Peru).

Mentos and soda eruptions- lessons on explosive volcanic eruptions
Students participate in a popular experiment with Mentos candies and soda. This helps them learn about the scientific method, gas saturation, bubble nucleation, and explosive volcanic eruptions.

Student-centered Experiments on Earthquake Occurrence Using the Seismic/Eruption Program
Students select their own region of interest and interrogate the earthquake catalog to obtain quantitative data on the rate of occurrence of earthquakes of various magnitudes within their chosen region.

Case Study 6.1- Adapting to a Changing World
In this activity, students consider how several communities are adapting to climate change-related problems including drought's impacts on agriculture, loss of assets due to climate-related hazards, freshwater ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
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Unit 3: How Streams Change
Students use Google Earth to observe two river systems and characterize changes in gradient from the headwaters to the mouth, and relate changes in those gradients to different rock types. At one location, they ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
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Unit 1 Hazards at Transform Plate Boundaries
This unit uses scientific data to quantify the geologic hazard that earthquakes represent along transform plate boundaries. Students will document the characteristics of the Pacific/North American plate boundary in ...

InTeGrate Developed This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process.
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How myths form: Accounts from Mt. Pelee
This is a great activity for class sizes ranging from small seminars to lecture classes. It's particularly appropriate for courses that relate hazards/volcanism to culture, society, and human interest subjects ...




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