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Classroom, Lab and Field Exercises in Geophysics

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Results 101 - 120 of 229 matches

Where is my house and how does it move? part of Cutting Edge:Geodesy:Activities
Guoquan Wang, University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez
This is a homework for UPRM GEOL4060–Applications of GPS in Geosciences. It is an elective course for geology majors. Students will measure the position of their house at the beginning of the semester and do ...

Glacial Isostatic Adjustment part of Cutting Edge:Geodesy:Activities
Aida Awad, Maine East High School / Oakton College
The activity begins with a hands-on lab students design to consider the relationship between increasing masses loaded on a viscous medium. Students then investigate the Antarctic ice sheet and Pleistocene glacial ...

Bragg's Law part of Cutting Edge:Deep Earth:Activities
Glenn Richard, SUNY at Stony Brook
"ON A COLD WINTER DAY IN DECEMBER, 1955, Robert Wentorf Jr. walked down to the local food co-op in Niskayuna, New York, and bought a jar of his favorite crunchy peanut butter. This was no ordinary shopping ...

Reading and responding to geological journal articles part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
Rory McFadden, Salem State University
This a semester long activity for students in a plate tectonics course will be read one (or two) geological journal articles every other week on the major topics covered in the course. Students will submit reading ...

The science behind Plate Tectonics part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
John Weber, Grand Valley State University
Plate tectonics is a quantitative, robust and testable, geologic model describing the surface motions of Earth's outer skin. It is based on real data and assumptions, and built using the scientific method. New ...

New Views of an Old Continent: A Tectonics Lab Exercise Using Geophysical Maps of Australia part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
David Greene, Denison University
In this lab activity students are given five different map views of the continent of Australia: Geology, Gravity Anomaly, Magnetic Anomaly, Digital Elevation, and Satellite Image, and asked to investigate and ...

Magnetic Survey Lab part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
Rob Sternberg, Franklin and Marshall College
To do a "magnetic survey" in the lab to understand the nature of magnetic anomalies, and to plot the data using profiles and contour maps.

Data Filtering and Noise Reduction part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
Scott Marshall, Appalachian State University
This lab utilizes the computer program, Excel. In this exercise students will generate synthetic data sets based on a simplified model of daily high temperatures in Boone, NC and apply several filtering techniques ...

Seismic Refraction Lab part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
Scott Marshall, Appalachian State University
The following lab will introduce students to the basic concepts of seismic refraction as well as some actual data collected during seismic refraction surveys. You will use your knowledge of seismic refraction to ...

Active Tectonics Field Trip part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
George Davis, University of Arizona
By far most field trips in structural geology and regional tectonics do NOT take place in large urban centers with a trip focus on mitigation of hazards. What is described here is an example of the instructional ...

Measuring the vertical gradient of gravity part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
Rob Sternberg, Franklin and Marshall College
The free-air effect tells us that as elevation above sea level increases, gravitational acceleration g decreases at the rate of about 0.3086 mgal/meter. This effect is routinely corrected for when making gravity ...

Skill puzzles part of Cutting Edge:Courses:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
Sarah Titus, Carleton College
These are short exercises that allow students practice with concepts in Structural Geology, Tectonics, or Geophysics. (Many of them were designed with Eric Horsman.) The basic idea is to give students opportunities ...

Isostasy: Exploring why continents are high and ocean floors are low part of Cutting Edge:Online Teaching:Activities for Teaching Online
Aurora Pun, University of New Mexico-Main Campus
A self-paced tutorial applies students' understanding of density in combination with analogies to apply principle of isostasy to explaining Earth's surface relief. The tutorial is bookended by online ...

Cause of the Mogul, Nevada, Earthquake Swarm, Spring 2008 part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Activities
Patricia Cashman, University of Nevada-Reno
Students examine data from fault- and magma- related earthquakes and determine distinguishing characteristics. They then apply these criteria to determine the cause of the Mogul earthquake sequence (that most of ...

Demonstrating P and S Waves with a Slinky part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Activities
Pier Bartow, Klamath Community College
P and S seismic waves can be demonstrated with a slinky. P waves have energy traveling parallel to the direction the wave is moving. S waves have energy traveling perpendicular to the direction the wave is moving.

Plotting Earthquakes with Near Real-Time Data part of Cutting Edge:Visualization:Examples
Bill Slattery, Wright State University-Main Campus
Students access the United States Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/map/ and plot the longitude latitude and depth of earthquakes on a physiographic ...

Tomography? How do we know what is below our feet? part of Cutting Edge:Topics:Deep Earth:Activities
Barbara Graham, College of Southern Nevada
A short Powerpoint presentation that introduces seismic topography to begin understanding how scientists infer the interior of the earth. Followed with a crossword puzzle to encourage vocabulary.

Acoustic Waves and Seismac part of Cutting Edge:Topics:Geodesy:Activities
Remke Van Dam, Michigan State University
The students will expand on their knowledge of acoustic signals (from class lectures and book readings) by watching videos and doing an in-class exercise with the seismac program.

Measuring earthquake and volcano activity from space part of Cutting Edge:Topics:Geodesy:Activities
Shimon Wdowinski, University of Miami
This tutorial is based on real InSAR observations acquired over the Andes from 1992 to 2005. It will get the student acquainted with InSAR observations and basic concepts of space geodesy.

El-Dab'a ground water aquifer assessment, Egypt part of Cutting Edge:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
elhamy Tarabees, Damanhour University
El-Dabaa area is an area located in the norther part of the western desert, Egypt and planed to be nuclear power point. Some vertical electrical sounding have been done there to evaluate the ground water aquifer ...