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Geomorphology Teaching Activities


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Mapping a local Dune Field, and estimating paleowind speed and direction part of Activities
We visit the Pinebush dune field in eastern New York State (20 minutes from campus). Students map one large parabolic dune, and collect sample of dune sand. In the lab, students map the dune field from aerial ...

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landscape Evolution, Landforms/Processes, Climate/Paleoclimate

Viewing geomorphic landforms with Google Earth part of Activities
Geomorphic processes are not limited to the local or regional area around the University and most students have not been outside of the region. With today's technology we are able to see features on the ...

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Hillslopes, Glacial/Periglacial, Fluvial, Coastal-zone, Karst, Mass Movement, Geoscience:Geology:Tectonics, Geomorphology:Weathering/Soils, Landforms/Processes, Landforms/Processes:Volcanoes, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Climate/Paleoclimate, Tectonic Geomorphology

Snowpack analysis part of Activities
Measurement and analysis of snowpack density and SWE. Students collect field data on the snowpack, analyse and interpret the data, and present their results.

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Climate/Paleoclimate

Geomorphology Field Research Project part of Activities
This research project allows students to integrate and apply their geomorphic knowledge in a comprehensive study of a local landscape. Working in teams, they investigate uplifted alluvial deposits along the ...

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Fluvial, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:GIS/Mapping/Field Techniques, Dating and Rates, Landforms/Processes:Hillslopes, Mass Movement, Geoscience:Geology:Tectonics, Geomorphology:Weathering/Soils, Tectonic Geomorphology, Climate/Paleoclimate, Landscape Evolution

Rainfall patterns and drainage density part of Activities
The students use ARC GIS to make maps of the island of Hawaii to identify the locations of river channels. The students are also given a map of precipitation so that they can relate drainage density to rainfall ...

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Fluvial, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Climate/Paleoclimate, GIS/Mapping/Field Techniques

Pinnacle Mountain Field Project part of Activities
Students collect, analyze, and interpret field data and identify and read literature on the possible origins of the block-fields on Pinnacle Mountain, central Arkansas.

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Hillslopes, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Climate/Paleoclimate

The geomorphology of home part of Activities
In this lab, students read and interpret 1) peer-reviewed literature, 2) LIDAR-derived hillshade maps, and 3) the landscape itself to better understand the geomorphology of their local urban/suburban environment ...

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Coastal-zone, Fluvial, Glacial/Periglacial, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landscape Evolution, Climate/Paleoclimate, Landforms/Processes:Mass Movement

Dam the Wilderness: Building "Green Hydropower" on Big Creek part of Activities
Students exercise knowledge of how dams impact physical and biological systems to try to design a dam that minimizes its impacts while still meeting power production and water diversion requirements.

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Fluvial, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Modeling/Physical Experiments, Environmental Science:Energy:Renewable & Alternative Energy, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Climate/Paleoclimate, Geoscience:Hydrology:Surface Water:Water Management and Policy

Exploring Soil Development & Conservation of Mass part of Activities
This activity aims to develop understanding of soil formation using the principles of conservation of mass. This is best applied to a chronosequence of 2 soils/deposits, such as a set of terraces or glacial ...

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Landforms/Processes:Glacial/Periglacial, Hillslopes, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Weathering/Soils, Climate/Paleoclimate, Dating and Rates

Paleoclimate Reconstruction: Walker Lake-Bloody Canyon Moraines of Mono Basin, California part of NAGT:Teaching Resources:Teaching in the Field:Field Trip Collection
In this activity students map and describe glacial geomorphic features related to Quaternary glaciations in the Sierra Nevada of central California. In this region, multiple sets of glacial moraines and corresponding bogs and lakes are evidence of various advances during the Pleistocene. With time, glacial features are modified by erosional processes resulting in morphological changes that we can use to relatively date the various features. Using cross-cutting relationships, moraine morphology, boulder description/counting, and various other relative dating techniques students will "date" the moraines. In this locality there are three main moraine crests that are well-preserved and available for students to hike along and gather data (classified as Tioga-Tenaya, Tahoe, and Mono Basin moraines). At a locality along each of the three different moraine crests, students will observe the boulders along the ridge crest (within ~5m of the crest) within a known area. The students will record the number of boulders, the degree of weathering of the boulders, the lithology, the size (~diameter), roundness, presence of lichen (describe), and the presence of striations on each boulder. They will also note the style and amount of vegetation on the moraine and soil characteristics (amount of gruss around boulders?) The students should make a table in their field notebooks so that it is easy to compile the data at the end of the day. Generally students work in groups of 2 or 3. Since many of these observations are somewhat qualitative it works well for them to be able to discuss their thoughts while gathering data. It is helpful to use a few boulders as examples to set some ground rules before starting the activity this will help the class be the same page with regard to the techniques.

Subject: Geomorphology: Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology:Climate/Paleoclimate, Geoscience:Geology:Geomorphology