On the Cutting Edge - Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty
Teaching About Energy in Geoscience Courses: Current Research and Pedagogy
Topical Resources
Cutting Edge > Energy > Course Descriptions

Energy Courses

Do you teach a course about energy? We encourage you to add your course to this collection.


Help

Results 21 - 28 of 28 matches

Energy and the Environment part of Energy Courses
Chris Sinton, Ithaca College
This course is designed to help students understand the earth energy system and the potential impact of human activity. Students are asked to gather and analyze data regarding energy generation, efficiency, and environmental impacts. The course focuses on quantitative analysis of energy systems, but also covers the socio-political and economic components.

GEOS 195 "Introduction to Fossil Fuels" part of Energy Courses
James Staub, University of Montana-Missoula, The
A a rigorous introductory course designed to provide an overview of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical principles and concepts associated with fossil fuel origins, exploration, development, production, and utilization. The course starts with a general introduction to fossil fuels and geologic principles and ends with a discussion of environmental issues associated with fossil fuel use.

Sustainable and Fossil Energy: Options and Consequences part of Energy Courses
This course will combine lectures, field trips and laboratory exercises to explore the science, technology, and policy implications of sustainable and fossil energy options. The course will be taught in Wyoming and Idaho and take advantage of the numerous energy resources of the Rocky Mountain region.

PC 121 - Energy and Society part of Energy Courses
Bob Ford, Frederick Community College
Explores the nature and properties of energy. Emphasizes a scientific understanding of energy and is role in the global society. Examines current and alternative energy sources used to meet the needs of a growing and developing society. Some Friday or Saturday field trips.

The Earth's Energy Resources (GEOL 115) part of Energy Courses
Richard Kettler, University of Nebraska at Lincoln
This course examines the geology of energy resources. Emphasis is placed on those energy resources that society values most highly and consumes most voraciously. We emphasize those aspects of geology that are particularly relevant to the production of energy resources and to attempts to estimate the ultimate global recovery of these resources. We also consider briefly policy issues related to energy resource development, production, and utilization.

Global Environmental Obstacles part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
Walter Borowski, Eastern Kentucky University
The course uses Mackenzie's Our Changing Planet as a template and investigates world population, diminishing water resources, anthropogenic effects on the atmosphere (ozone hole and acid rain), and global warming. While assessing these global environmental problems, students will learn about deep time, cycling of substances, plate tectonics, and geologic climate change.

GEOL3650: Energy: A Geological Perspective part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
James Myers, University of Wyoming
Examines the energy needs of a modern industrialized society. Looks at the typesof energy, the natural laws that govern its use, transformation, and conservation. The different sources of energy available to modern societies are examined. Examination includes fossil fuels, nuclear power as well as alternative energy sources. The formation of the resource is dicussed, how it is extracted, and any environmental consequences assoicated with its extraction and use.

Environment and the Earth Class part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Service Learning:Examples
Compiled by Suzanne Savanick, Science Education Resource Center. Based on Bixby et al. (2003), Ecology on Campus: Service Learning in Introductory Environmental Courses, Journal of College Science Teaching, v. 32, n.5, o, 327-331.
Approximately 150 undergraduate students in the Environment and the Earth class at the University of South Carolina participated in a campus environmental service-learning project. The students collected data on lighting, water fixtures, recycling bins, and trash in five academic buildings. Signs were hung in the buildings and data were collected a second time.



« Previous Page      Next Page »