Cutting Edge > Topics > Energy > Course Descriptions

Energy Courses

Do you teach a course about energy? We encourage you to add your course to this collection.


Help

Results 11 - 20 of 28 matches

Geoscience and Global Concerns part of Cutting Edge:Energy:Energy Courses
Glenn Richard, SUNY at Stony Brook
An exploration of how technologically-based problems facing the United States and the world relate to the Earth system, including the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The set of issues include such geoscience-based topics as fossil fuel resources, nuclear power, renewable energy sources, global warming, meteorology, and seismology.

Energy and the Environment part of Cutting Edge:Energy:Energy Courses
Chris Sinton, Ithaca College
This course is designed to help students understand the earth energy system and the potential impact of human activity. Students are asked to gather and analyze data regarding energy generation, efficiency, and environmental impacts. The course focuses on quantitative analysis of energy systems, but also covers the socio-political and economic components.

GEOS 195 "Introduction to Fossil Fuels" part of Cutting Edge:Energy:Energy Courses
James Staub, University of Montana-Missoula, The
A a rigorous introductory course designed to provide an overview of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical principles and concepts associated with fossil fuel origins, exploration, development, production, and utilization. The course starts with a general introduction to fossil fuels and geologic principles and ends with a discussion of environmental issues associated with fossil fuel use.

PC 121 - Energy and Society part of Cutting Edge:Energy:Energy Courses
Bob Ford, Frederick Community College
Explores the nature and properties of energy. Emphasizes a scientific understanding of energy and is role in the global society. Examines current and alternative energy sources used to meet the needs of a growing and developing society. Some Friday or Saturday field trips.

Global Environmental Obstacles part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
Walter Borowski, Eastern Kentucky University
The course uses Mackenzie's Our Changing Planet as a template and investigates world population, diminishing water resources, anthropogenic effects on the atmosphere (ozone hole and acid rain), and global warming. While assessing these global environmental problems, students will learn about deep time, cycling of substances, plate tectonics, and geologic climate change.

GEOL3650: Energy: A Geological Perspective part of Quantitative Skills:Courses
James Myers, University of Wyoming
Examines the energy needs of a modern industrialized society. Looks at the typesof energy, the natural laws that govern its use, transformation, and conservation. The different sources of energy available to modern societies are examined. Examination includes fossil fuels, nuclear power as well as alternative energy sources. The formation of the resource is dicussed, how it is extracted, and any environmental consequences assoicated with its extraction and use.

Environment and the Earth Class part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Service Learning:Examples
Compiled by Suzanne Savanick, Science Education Resource Center. Based on Bixby et al. (2003), Ecology on Campus: Service Learning in Introductory Environmental Courses, Journal of College Science Teaching, v. 32, n.5, o, 327-331.
Approximately 150 undergraduate students in the Environment and the Earth class at the University of South Carolina participated in a campus environmental service-learning project. The students collected data on lighting, water fixtures, recycling bins, and trash in five academic buildings. Signs were hung in the buildings and data were collected a second time.

Environmental Economics and Policy part of QuIRK:Courses
Aaron Swoboda, Carleton College
This course explores the economic and political institutions affecting the environment. We will use the tools of economics to analyze several contemporary environmental policy issues ranging from climate change, local land use, agriculture, and water.

Solar Energy part of Integrate:Workshops:Systems, Society, Sustainability and the Geosciences:Courses
Scott Cummings, Kenyon College
Solar Energy (CHEM 108) is a one-semester chemistry lecture and discussion course designed for students majoring outside of the natural sciences. With an emphasis on quantitative reasoning, the course explores the chemical principles associated with societal fossil-fuel use (and associated environmental problems) and solar-energy technologies that could offer sustainable solutions.

Pacific Seminar 2: Sustainability part of Energy Courses
Gene Pearson, University of the Pacific
The course introduces students to the concept of sustainability and how sustainability policies are developed and implemented in corporations, universities, and non-profit and government agencies. Students explore the best ways for government agencies to encourage individuals and organizations to implement sustainable practices.



« Previous Page      Next Page »