Workshop Planning

Workshop Expectations | Role of Co-convener | Leader and Participant Roles | Designing Effective Workshops

Emerging theme workshops by their nature require planning by a team that spans the expertise needed to fully engage the topic and includes experts in workshop planning. The following process is used by the On the Cutting Edge project to develop emerging theme workshops.

  1. Topics will be selected by the PIs approximately one year in advance based on input from the geoscience education community and Advisory Board.
  2. A leader in the emerging theme will be identified to serve as a co-convener. That person will work with the PI responsible for the workshop to refine the specific workshop goals and to identify the workshop planning committee. The workshop goals and committee are submitted to the PI team for comment
  3. Using electronic and phone communications, the workshop planning committee will review and refine the workshop goals. They will then create a workshop program meeting these goals and the general goals outlined above. The planning committee will also identify workshop leaders able to execute the various aspects of the program, as well as participants who should be encouraged to apply for the workshop.
  4. The PI and co-convener will take responsibility for encouraging applications within the specific target community, selecting the participants and developing the program materials. They will work to engage the planning team fully in these aspects of workshop development.
  5. A website with resources will be developed to support the workshop.
  6. On the Cutting Edge PIs will set an approximate schedule for planning each workshop, and the planning team will adhere to those scheduling guidelines.

Workshop Expectations

All workshops are expected to

Role of Co-convener

Workshop Leader and Participant Roles

These roles should be made clear in the workshop information prior to application.

Designing Effective Workshops

All Cutting Edge workshops are based on the results of research on learning that indicate the importance of actively engaging students in learning (AAAS, 1990; NRC, 1996, 2000; NSF, 1996). The following effective practices form the foundation of workshop design, planning, and delivery.